Representing Professional Actors and Print Talent in the Southeast
  
  

Resume Info

Resume Sample Resume

Creative interpretations of billing are common on actors’ resumés. Certainly, there are variations from market to market, but the standard for actors’ resumés is pretty clear. Follow our company format. List the project name, the type of role, and the director or production company. Do not include extra work. If you do not have room to list all your film, TV and theatre credits, it is fine to include a parenthetical notation of “partial list.” Be sure to bring the full list with you to an audition, and be prepared to show it to the Casting Director if asked.

Use the sample resume that we provide as a guide.

Film Billing

Lead: principal role in the film, in most scenes, on-screen credit is often in the credits that start the film (as well as in the complete end credits)

Supporting: principal role in the film, in one or more scenes but not a lead character although important to the storyline.

Featured: principal role in the film with one or more lines but easily cut from the final version of the film. Unfortunately, many extras use the term “featured” to describe their extra work and that means Casting Directors are less convinced that a job listed as “featured” actually was a featured principal role.

Extra: non-speaking role in the film with no on-screen credit. Do not list extra work on an acting resumé.

Television Billing

Series Regular: contract role with exclusivity to the series, network, and production company for a term of a year or more; paid for a predetermined number of episodes produced, on contract for all episodes, even those in which the character doesn’t appear.

Recurring: character returns over multiple episodes, either on standing contract or contracted periodically, based on negotiations and number of appearances.

Guest Star: one-episode guest whose character’s storyline is central to that episode, works at a weekly rate and is typically under contract for the week, even if only shooting a day or two.

Co-star: one-episode guest whose character’s storyline may or may not be central to that episode (co-star billing actually depends more on negotiation than size of role), anywhere from one line to multiple scenes.

Contract Role: a soap opera AFTRA contract term for a daytime series regular or recurring character.

Under 5: an AFTRA-only contract term for a character with between one and five lines.

Extra: non-speaking role with no on-screen credit. Do not list extra work on an acting resumé.

Theatre Billing

Billing is pretty much non-existent for theatre credits on a resumé. Most theatre credits include the character name, as role size is generally known. If, however, the production is of an original work or relatively new play, it is fine to include a parenthetical notation of “lead” or “supporting” after the character name.

Commercial Billing

Principal: principal role in the film, in one or more scenes. Can be speaking or non-speaking. If you have a separate commercial resume, you are not required to list all your commercial credits. Make the parenthetical notation “full list available on request” and be prepared to show a CD your commercial resume if they ask.

Industrial Video Billing


Principal: principal role in the film, in one or more scenes. Can be speaking or non-speaking.

Training

List the name of the school or studio, the type of class, the instructor’s name and city.

Skills

List things you can actually do and be prepared to demonstrate your skill to a CD during an audition or callback. You can make a distinction between athletic, performance and language skills.
NOTE: Content on this page paraphrased from “Self-Management for Actors” by Bonnie Gillespie.